World

Mon, 07/07/2014 - 7:00pm

UBALDO tells the story of a religious cultural festival that traces its roots back 850 years. The celebration, known as the "La Festa Dei Ceri," occurs in only two places in the world: the unlikely sister cities of Gubbio, in Umbria, Italy, and Jessup, a coal-mining town in northeast Pennsylvania. Shot entirely on location, UBALDO captures the intensity of key moments from both festivals — from the raising of the statues onto the platforms, to the sprinting of the platform teams to the strategizing of the team captains. The film also details the expressive language and precise protocols of La Festa Dei Ceri, including colorful community activities leading up to the race, and the traditional uniforms worn by the platform bearers.

Civil War: The Untold Story
Sun, 07/13/2014 - 9:00pm

#105 "With Malice Toward None"
In the spring of 1864, General William Tecumseh Sherman’s force of 100-thousand men marches from Chattanooga toward Atlanta, Georgia, the industrial hub of the Deep South. Twenty miles north of Atlanta, Sherman’s army is soundly defeated at Kennesaw Mountain. Sherman’s defeat combined with Grant’s stalemate in Virginia, enrages a Northern electorate already weary of war. The presidential election is in November, and Abraham Lincoln’s chances for a second term are dwindling by the day. The Democrats nominate George McClellan. The party’s platform calls for a negotiated peace with the Confederacy in which slaveholders will be allowed to keep their property. If McClellan is elected, Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation will almost certainly be struck down. Though victorious at Kennesaw Mountain, the outnumbered Confederate Army falls back to a defensive position at Atlanta. After 6 weeks of bloody conflicts around Atlanta, Sherman wires Washington: “Atlanta is ours and fairly won.” For the first time in the war, many in the North now believe victory can be achieved. Eight weeks later, the president defeats McClellan in a landslide. After the election, Sherman begins his March to the Sea. The largely unopposed march across Georgia to Savannah is a psychological blow to the Confederacy, and a stunning conclusion to the Western Theater.

Civil War: The Untold Story
Sun, 07/06/2014 - 9:00pm

#104 "Death Knell of the Confederacy"
September 19, 1863. The first day of the Battle of Chickamauga ends in a bloody draw. On the next day, the battle is determined by one of the biggest blunders of the Civil War. Miscommunication, confusion, and fatigue with Union General William Rosecrans and his generals have left a gap in the Union line more than a quarter mile wide. James Longstreet’s force of 11,000 from the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, pour through the gap and split the Union army in two. Rosecrans and his beaten army escape to Chattanooga. Chickamauga’s combined casualties of 34,000 are only topped by the carnage at Gettysburg. In October, Rosecrans is replaced by U.S. Grant, who immediately plans an offensive. In November 1863, Grant routes the Confederate stronghold just outside Chattanooga. As they escape southward into Georgia, a Confederate officer calls the devastating defeat: “the death knell of the Confederacy.”

Sat, 07/05/2014 - 2:00pm

This documentary chronicles the life and legend of Marie-Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier, the Marquis de Lafayette — an intriguing, neglected, and controversial figure from both the American and French Revolutions who at one time was the most famous man in the world. The film examines why a wealthy young French aristocrat would leave the comforts of the court to help a fledgling nation on another continent fight for independence, the nature of the daring path he then set upon, and how the concept of liberty steered so many choices in his life. Lafayette’s life and quest to bring democracy to America and France is shared, in part, as recorded in the extensive letters and memoirs of Lafayette; his wife, Adrienne de Noailles; and his close friend, George Washington. The documentary’s narrative is also driven by a present-day search by Lafayette’s descendant, Sabine Renault-Sabloniere, to find out more about her ancestor, uncovering the largely untold story of Lafayette’s wife, Adrienne, second daughter of the Duke de Noailles, and the arranged marriage that turned into a great romance and a partnership in revolution.

Fri, 07/04/2014 - 6:00pm

ANTHEM tells the story behind Francis Scott Key's "The Star-Spangled Banner," the song famously penned after the relentless bombardment by the British of Fort McHenry during The War of 1812. Historians and music experts discuss the Colonial-era songs and events that influenced Key to write what would become the U.S. national anthem. ANTHEM also reveals interesting facts about Key's upbringing and religious leanings while tracing the origins of the song. During the program, the U.S. Naval Academy Glee Club and St. John's College Chorus give voice to this stirring and elegant song, including a performance of its first draft.

Wed, 07/02/2014 - 3:30pm

An American Mosque is a groundbreaking documentary about religious freedom and the struggle against intolerance set in a rural California town. Sparked by the destruction of a mosque, we witness how a community responds to hate through painful but ultimately positive discussions about the perception of Islam in America and our responsibility to defend everyone’s Constitutional right to worship. In the end, determined members of different faiths come together to support the Muslim community as it peacefully rebuilds its mosque. As mosque projects are increasingly scrutinized around the country, An American Mosque tells a timely story that suggests how we can become a more tolerant society.

Tue, 07/01/2014 - 10:00pm

PBS NEWSHOUR continues to provide in-depth analysis of current events with the NEWSHOUR’s team of seasoned and highly regarded journalists. Co-anchored by Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff, the nightly broadcast features Jeffrey Brown, chief correspondent for arts, culture, and society; and Margaret Warner, chief foreign correspondent, who deliver compelling original reporting and newsmaker interviews from the field. Senior correspondent Hari Sreenivasan delivers news to the digital world and anchors the news summary on the television broadcasts.
For tonight's topics, visit the Newshour website here.

Perfect Day
Mon, 06/30/2014 - 1:00pm

Amid the fjords and glacier at Lofoten, a string of islands stretching from the northwestern Norway into the Atlantic, adventurous Tina Nordström hikes a glacier and prepares a chilly apple sorbet and drink. Later she visits a longbow house and Viking museum where she cooks without the benefit of modern-day appliances. Recipes: Storm Soup – Potato and Onion Soup with Horseradish and Ham Breadsticks; Fire- Cooked Salmon on Birch Wood with Caper and Grape Salad; Baked Apples with Cardamom and Vodka Sorbet; Apple Sorbet on Black Ice. (Episode #101)

Mon, 06/30/2014 - 10:00pm

PBS NEWSHOUR continues to provide in-depth analysis of current events with the NEWSHOUR’s team of seasoned and highly regarded journalists. Co-anchored by Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff, the nightly broadcast features Jeffrey Brown, chief correspondent for arts, culture, and society; and Margaret Warner, chief foreign correspondent, who deliver compelling original reporting and newsmaker interviews from the field. Senior correspondent Hari Sreenivasan delivers news to the digital world and anchors the news summary on the television broadcasts.
For tonight's topics, visit the pbs news hour website HERE.

Civil War:The Untold Story
Sun, 06/29/2014 - 9:00pm

Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation does not only free slaves in the rebelling states. It changes the war from one of reunification, to one of ending slavery. The Emancipation Proclamation also gives African Americans freedom to fight. By war’s end, some 200,000 will enlist. In truth, Lincoln’s proclamation is an empty promise without the power of the United States Army to enforce it. In 1863, Ulysses S. Grant begins a campaign to take Vicksburg, Mississippi, a Confederate citadel overlooking a strategic section of the lower Mississippi River. In May, Grant begins laying siege to the city of 4500. Mary Loughborough is one of the many terrified civilians who have dug caves into the hillsides for protection. Clutching her 2-year old daughter, Mary “endeavored by constant prayer to prepare myself for the sudden death I was almost certain awaited me.” On July 4, 1863 – the day after Pickett’s disastrous charge at Gettysburg – the Confederates surrender Vicksburg to Grant. With the Mississippi River now under Union control, the campaign moves eastward to Chattanooga, Tennessee, a rail center that Lincoln considers to be as important as the Confederate capital of Richmond. Eight miles south, along the Chickamauga - a creek the Cherokee call “the river of death” - Union and Confederate forces clash in what will become the biggest battle of the Western Theater.

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