World

Sun, 04/27/2014 - 12:00pm

Narrated by Oscar-winning actress Frances McDormand, REBELS WITH A CAUSE spotlights a small group of people who banded together to protect and preserve open spaces near urban areas for parks and farms from rampant development. In doing so, they brought about America's system of national seashores and recreation areas. The film begins in the 1950s and tells the tale of this disparate band of activists who, despite reversals, diversions, and disappointments, persisted in their mission for 20 years. Their cause crosses party lines, unifies seemingly antagonistic foes, falters and is nearly extinguished many times along the way, but is ultimately victorious. REBELS WITH A CAUSE documents a fascinating example of a hard-fought campaign to preserve something important to all Americans – our public lands.

Fri, 04/25/2014 - 6:00pm

The American West has been the nation’s battleground for the preservation of wild lands. But have 21st-century growth and energy demands relegated wilderness to the pages of history? In this visually stunning documentary, Robert Redford joins a group of diverse voices in debating the need and purpose of wilderness. Peter Coyote narrates.

Thu, 04/24/2014 - 6:00pm

How can the United States meet its ever-expanding demands on the ocean without destroying it? To answer this question, OCEAN FRONTIERS introduces the unlikely allies joining forces to improve conditions in the waters off America's coasts. OCEAN FRONTIERS: THE DAWN OF A NEW ERA IN OCEAN STEWARDSHIP travels to four seaports and watersheds to observe new, long-term approaches to ocean management— from the busy shipping lanes of Boston Harbor to a small fishing community in the Pacific Northwest; from coral reefs in the Florida Keys to the nation's premier seafood nursery in the Mississippi Delta. Along the way, OCEAN FRONTIERS captures inspiring stories of scientists, businesses, farmers, sport and commercial fishermen, governments and citizens coming together to save the seas that sustain them.

Mon, 04/21/2014 - 8:00pm

One-hundred and fifty-one years after Frederick Law Olmsted (1822–1903) designed New York City’s Central Park with Calvert Vaux, it remains an undisputed haven of tranquility amid one of most unnatural places in the world. OLMSTED AND AMERICA'S URBAN PARKS, narrated by actress Kerry Washington, examines the visionary urban planner and landscape architect's impact on the development of America's first great city parks. Told in large part through Olmsted's own words (voiced by Oscar-winner Kevin Kline), this film weaves together his poignant personal story and pioneering vision with contemporary footage of the lasting masterpieces he left behind.

Mon, 06/02/2014 - 8:00pm

This documentary examines the life and mysterious death of pioneering Mexican-American journalist Ruben Salazar. At the heart of the story is his transformation from a mainstream, establishment Los Angeles Times reporter to a supporter and primary chronicler of the radical Chicano movement of the late 1960s. Killed by a law enforcement officer in 1970, Salazar became an instant martyr to the Latino community — which had often criticized his reporting. Featuring material from recently released files, the program removes Salazar from the glare of myth and martyrdom and offers a clear-eyed look at the man.

Sun, 04/20/2014 - 1:00pm

AMERICAN JERUSALEM tells the remarkable story of the pioneering Jews of San Francisco. Drawn to California by the Gold Rush, Jews were welcomed in San Francisco as nowhere else and would go on to build a thriving community, the second largest Jewish community in the United States after New York. With their newfound freedom, Jews played a central role in the transformation of this once-sleepy maritime village into the largest metropolis in the American West. As Jews integrated into mainstream San Francisco society, they were forced to reinvent what it meant for them to be Jewish, to create in essence a new kind of Jew – San Francisco Jew.

Life on the Line
Fri, 04/18/2014 - 6:00pm

Words can’t describe how traumatic life is after a disabling injury. This episode explores how individuals are turning their tragedy into triumph and proving that disability doesn’t mean inability.

Wed, 04/16/2014 - 6:00pm

Coexist examines Rwanda's social experiment in government-mandated reconciliation following the 1994 genocide of more than half a million Tutsi and moderate Hutu. Released from prison in 2003, thousands of Hutus responsible for the slaughter faced little choice but to return to the villages where they once terrorized their neighbors. To weaken the impulse toward retaliation, the Rwandan government sponsored workshops, seminars and healing groups in the hopes of ending the cycle of violence and beginning the process of rehumanization. The compelling and often heartbreaking stories of victims, perpetrators and witnesses illuminate the challenges of this one-size-fits-all policy while exploring many difficult questions at the heart of the human experience.

Tue, 04/15/2014 - 9:30pm

Native American music may not conjure images of tubas, trumpets and John Phillip Sousa marches. Yet this vibrant musical tradition has been a part of Native American culture for more than 100 years. SOUSA ON THE REZ: MARCHING TO THE BEAT OF A DIFFERENT DRUM traces the origins of the four remaining multi-generational, community-based tribal bands: the Iroquois Indian Band from upstate New York, the Fort Mojave Tribal Band from Needles, Calif., the Zuni Pueblo Band from northwestern New Mexico and the Navajo Nation Band from Arizona. Combining profiles of contemporary bands with fresh historical research, SOUSA ON THE REZ offers an unexpected and engaging picture of this little-known aspect of the Native music scene.

Survival: Lives in the Balance
Sat, 04/12/2014 - 2:00pm

Malaria threatens half of the world’s population. Malaria killed Clovis’s young daughter. Clovis learned too late that, if caught early, a three-day course of drugs easily cures malaria. The drug is called Coartem. The main ingredient is Arteminisin, a chemical extracted from the Artemisia plant. The drug is expensive. Most developing countries cannot afford to buy enough to meet the needs of their people. Clovis discovered he can easily grow Artemisia on his farm in Uganda. He has invested much of his family’s resources into farming the plant. He’s created a community of small farmers that can produce enough Artemisia to sell it in bulk to a processing company. A new company policy, however, may stand in the way of income for this cooperative of farmers.

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