World

Sun, 06/08/2014 - 11:00am

Barry Kibrick interviews top thinkers, writers, business leaders, artists, and others, drawing out the essence of the subject and the layers that lie between the lines. This 9-time EMMY nominated series and winner of the 2008, 2009 and 2010 Los Angeles EMMY for Best host and Studio show is going national.

Sat, 06/07/2014 - 2:00pm

EAGLES OF MERCY recounts a seldom-told chapter in the World War II narrative, picking up in the opening moments of D-Day. In the early hours of June 6, 1944, two young American medics with the 101st Airborne "Screaming Eagles" parachuted into France, and soon found themselves trapped in a 12th-century Norman church in the small village of Angoville-au-Plain. Medics Robert Wright and Kenneth Moore provided first aid to the first casualties of D-Day while a savage battle raged outside between American and German forces. During the documentary, Wright and Moore recount the rigors of basic training, parachuting into Normandy ahead of the amphibious landing on Utah Beach, surviving German anti-aircraft artillery and carrying on their life-saving work even when their unit retreated. EAGLES OF MERCY supplements these compelling stories with newsreel footage, re-enactments and interviews with fellow medics and residents of Angoville.

Fri, 06/06/2014 - 6:00pm

On June 6, 1944, thousands of Allied servicemen landed on the shores of northern France, tasked with liberating western Europe from Nazi tyranny. Over the ensuing hours and days, the men faced decimating machine-gun fire, mortars and artillery, eventually fighting their way inland, but not before suffering a staggering number of casualties. To commemorate the 70th anniversary of the Normandy landing, four D-Day veterans gather at the famed Museum of World War II outside of Boston, Mass. to share their experiences from that fateful "Day of Days." Cameras eavesdrop on their conversations as they vividly recall details from their ordeal — from the perils of the amphibious assault to the invasion's gruesome aftermath. Their interactions with one another yield long-buried, and often painful, memories. They recount their transformations from boys to men, reveal their uneasiness with the term "hero," and grapple with why they survived when so many others did not.

Thu, 06/05/2014 - 3:00pm

THE DAY IT SNOWED IN MIAMI traces the political activism behind an equal-rights statute in Miami, and how it galvanized the gay rights movement in Florida and beyond. Thirty five years ago, as snowflakes prepared to dust palm trees in a city known for its warmth, Miami-Dade County lawmakers unknowingly debated an issue that would ignite a political maelstrom. The seemingly benign ordinance — essentially an addendum to the county's existing anti-discrimination legislation — sought to prohibit discrimination in housing, public accommodations or employment based on the basis of "affectional or sexual preference." On Jan. 18, 1977, a throng of conservatives led by singer and Florida Orange Juice spokeswoman Anita Bryant packed downtown commission chambers in protest. The commissioners ultimately passed the ordinance by a narrow 5-3 margin, but Bryant vowed to lead a repeal — and succeeded. The ordinance set back the gay-rights movement for decades; it took more than 20 years for Miami-Dade to revive and pass the law. The 90-minute documentary also chronicles the tragic effects of the AIDS pandemic in South Florida, and the ironic, compassionate turn in public opinion towards the gay community.

Wed, 06/04/2014 - 6:00pm

More Americans have been lost to AIDS than in all the U.S. wars since 1900, and the pandemic has killed 22 million people worldwide. Few know about the existence of the National AIDS Memorial, a seven-acre grove hidden in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park. This documentary chronicles the garden’s transformation from a neglected eyesore to a landscaped sanctuary to a national memorial. The film shows how a community in crisis found healing and remembrance, and how the seeds of a few visionary environmentalists blossomed into something larger than they could have imagined. However, controversy erupted over an international design competition, opening up questions of what it means to be a national memorial — and how to mark a time of unimaginable loss.

Tue, 06/03/2014 - 6:00pm

CUBA MIA: PORTRAIT OF AN ALL-WOMAN ORCHESTRA captures the musicians of the all-female orchestra Camerata Romeu as they prepare for an end-of-the-year concert in Old Havana’s Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi. With one of the world’s most beautiful churches as the backdrop, the women play a unique blend of classical music, created by famous Cuban and Latin American composers. The program profiles the musicians — ranging from a talented young violinist to a mature bass player. CUBA MIA follows the musicians and conductor Zenaida Romeu as they juggle their studies, and in some cases motherhood, with a demanding schedule and complex musical repertoire.

Sun, 06/01/2014 - 8:00pm

Narrated by Martin Sheen, MESSENGER OF THE TRUTH tells the remarkable true story of Catholic priest and human rights activist Father Jerzy Popieluszko (1947-1984), whose faith, conviction and courage mobilized the people of Poland to stand against Communist rule during the 1980s. In his powerful sermons, Father Jerzy spoke about human rights, railed against injustice and tyranny, and advocated for truth and freedom. Archival recordings and footage from his masses provide a glimpse into how Father Jerzy's stirring oratory ignited and sustained the Polish Solidarity movement. Father Jerzy's following in this almost wholly Catholic country, not to mention his outspokenness on behalf of workers' rights, eventually drew the attention of the Soviet-backed regime and the secret police. Members of the Polish internal intelligence agency eventually succeeded in silencing Father Jerzy, assassinating him in 1984. Not surprisingly, Father Jerzy's death turned the young priest into a martyr and only served to further galvanize the movement and the nation. His legacy was further cemented in 2010, when Pope Benedict beatified Father Jerzy — the last step before achieving sainthood in the Roman Catholic Church.

Fri, 05/30/2014 - 6:00pm

Between 1942 and 1945, The Poston Relocation Center in Arizona housed more than 18,000 Japanese and Japanese-Americans, who worked as laborers to construct schools, farm the land and construct an irrigation system. PASSING POSTON: AN AMERICAN STORY recounts the moving and haunting stories of four former detainees. A tragic past haunts each person, now in the last chapter of their lives, as they struggle to reconcile the trauma of their youth. They also give voice to the sense of dislocation Japanese-Americans felt and how many of them still search and yearn to find their rightful place in the United States.

Thu, 05/29/2014 - 6:00pm

D-Day was a logistical effort on a scale never seen before or since. On the day itself, 3,000 planes dropped 23,000 airborne troops behind German lines, and 7,000 ships delivered around 20,000 military vehicles and 130,000 soldiers onto the beaches. Once on the shore, the troops had to negotiate two million mines buried in the sand, 46,000 fearsome beach obstacles and hundreds of miles of barbed wire, while dodging the shells and bullets fired by 40,000 German defenders. This film takes advantage of LiDAR technology to re-create the landscape and allow viewers to switch effortlessly between the macro and the micro — pulling back for the big picture and zooming in to a close-up of a single soldier on the battlefield.

Wed, 05/28/2014 - 7:30pm

Painfully transformed by ovarian cancer, breast cancer, heart failure and a dramatic loss of skin pigment, Lalita Bharvani is a beautiful woman whose resilient spirit survives. Indelible Lalita tells her story as she moves from Bombay to Paris to Montréal, and becomes completely White along the way.

At the age of 60, Lalita is fighting breast cancer and heart disease as her mother lives out her last days in India. Through these health crises, she has somehow managed to find the joy in life, letting go of her body as the expression of her femininity and ethnicity – and, ultimately, as the only vessel for her spirit. Indelible Lalita poses the question: How linked is one’s identity to one’s physical appearance?

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