World

Wed, 04/16/2014 - 6:00pm

Coexist examines Rwanda's social experiment in government-mandated reconciliation following the 1994 genocide of more than half a million Tutsi and moderate Hutu. Released from prison in 2003, thousands of Hutus responsible for the slaughter faced little choice but to return to the villages where they once terrorized their neighbors. To weaken the impulse toward retaliation, the Rwandan government sponsored workshops, seminars and healing groups in the hopes of ending the cycle of violence and beginning the process of rehumanization. The compelling and often heartbreaking stories of victims, perpetrators and witnesses illuminate the challenges of this one-size-fits-all policy while exploring many difficult questions at the heart of the human experience.

Tue, 04/15/2014 - 9:30pm

Native American music may not conjure images of tubas, trumpets and John Phillip Sousa marches. Yet this vibrant musical tradition has been a part of Native American culture for more than 100 years. SOUSA ON THE REZ: MARCHING TO THE BEAT OF A DIFFERENT DRUM traces the origins of the four remaining multi-generational, community-based tribal bands: the Iroquois Indian Band from upstate New York, the Fort Mojave Tribal Band from Needles, Calif., the Zuni Pueblo Band from northwestern New Mexico and the Navajo Nation Band from Arizona. Combining profiles of contemporary bands with fresh historical research, SOUSA ON THE REZ offers an unexpected and engaging picture of this little-known aspect of the Native music scene.

Survival: Lives in the Balance
Sat, 04/12/2014 - 2:00pm

Malaria threatens half of the world’s population. Malaria killed Clovis’s young daughter. Clovis learned too late that, if caught early, a three-day course of drugs easily cures malaria. The drug is called Coartem. The main ingredient is Arteminisin, a chemical extracted from the Artemisia plant. The drug is expensive. Most developing countries cannot afford to buy enough to meet the needs of their people. Clovis discovered he can easily grow Artemisia on his farm in Uganda. He has invested much of his family’s resources into farming the plant. He’s created a community of small farmers that can produce enough Artemisia to sell it in bulk to a processing company. A new company policy, however, may stand in the way of income for this cooperative of farmers.

Life on the Line
Fri, 04/11/2014 - 6:00pm

Child abuse is much more common than we think. The statistics are staggering, with one in four girls and one in six boys molested by the age of 18.Three individuals uncover their childhood secrets of abuse while clinicians share the dramatic the dramatic effect it has one a person’s life. “End It Now” raises awareness about this silent killer and explores the part we can play in prevention.

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 6:00pm

Explore the inside story of the Cuban Missile Crisis in October 1962, when the world teetered on the brink of nuclear holocaust. In the first major feature documentary on the subject, the film brings to life the three central characters — Kennedy, Castro and Khrushchev — and explores how the world’s most powerful men fell into an abyss of their own making and outlines the courage and luck it took to climb out again.

Survival: Lives in the Balance
Sat, 04/05/2014 - 2:00pm

Nineteen-month old Nazario can barely breathe. He has pneumonia, the world’s number one child killer. Nazario has been coughing for weeks. Burns scar the toddler’s chest where a traditional healer splattered hot wax to ward off evil spirits. The build up of fluid in Nazario’s lungs and chest cavity have pushed his windpipe and his heart across his body. His parents have finally taken him to the hospital. They have never heard of pneumonia, even though in the Philippines one in every five children under the age of five suffers from the disease. World wide, pneumonia kills two million children every year. Now throughout the Philippines, every day people are armed with training to help parents recognize pneumonia in time to provide life-saving treatment.

Life on the Line
Fri, 04/04/2014 - 6:00pm

For the Escarcega family, their worst nightmare becomes a harrowing reality. Their newborn baby is slowly dying from congenital heart disease. Doctors tell them it’s the beginning of the end…unless a heart becomes available for transplant surgery. Will Baby David receive a heart in time? “Heart to Heart” follows Baby David’s journey ad reflects on the pioneering efforts of infant heart transplantation with Baby Fae.

Thu, 04/03/2014 - 2:00pm

THE GOLDEN GAME: BASEBALL IN SACRAMENTO nostalgically recounts Sacramento's 150-year baseball history: its early teams and ballparks, the players, important victories, unresolved controversies and unforgettable moments. Among other highlights, the film chronicles the Sacramento Solons' dramatic come-from-behind victory against rival Los Angeles for the 1942 Pacific Coast League series title, the mysterious fire at Edmonds Field (and why some believe the team set it), and the 2000 opening of Raley Field, home of the triple-A champion River Cats. Contemporary footage and archival stills from baseball's early days, along with comments from former players, game announcers, historians and fans, reveal the indelible impression baseball has left on Sacramento and the mark Sacramento has left on the game.

Wed, 04/02/2014 - 4:00pm

The catastrophic March 11, 2011 earthquake in Eastern Japan, the ensuing tsunami, and the devastating nuclear power plant accident left nearly 20,000 people dead or missing. Nearly three years later, many citizens remain displaced from their homes and still struggle to rebuild their lives. TOMORROW: JAPAN BEYOND 3/11, a documentary series produced by Japan's public broadcaster NHK, focuses on Japan's reconstruction efforts following the disaster. Cameras follow world-renowned artists, filmmakers, thinkers and athletes as they visit the hardest-hit regions and support survivors.

Tue, 04/01/2014 - 6:00pm

LIVING COURAGEOUSLY: THE SPIRIT OF WOMEN celebrates the courage of women in times of crisis. The half-hour documentary, which also features insights from actress and advocate Jane Seymour, profiles three American women whose lives have been transformed by challenging — even devastating — circumstances. Alison Levine overcame a life-threatening heart condition to become an international mountain climber, lead the first U.S. women’s Everest expedition and head a foundation that helps Ugandan women find work as mountain guides. Once involved with drugs and alcohol, Francine Ward's near-fatal car accident transformed her; she earned her law degree and now coaches women on self-esteem issues and works with teenagers struggling with addiction. Photographer Sheila Hagler — the first member of her family to graduate from college — now works with at-risk teens in a rural Alabama community devastated by Hurricane Katrina.

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