World

Thu, 03/06/2014 - 4:00pm

Watch a portrait of the U.S. sled hockey team as they prepare for the Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia. Sled hockey, also known as “murderball on blades,” is played as aggressively as able-bodied hockey — but these players battle with their sticks, sharp sled runners and the serrated ice picks used to propel their sleds. Strapped into molded sleds, they’re often playing at eye level with the fast-moving puck in this game of force, speed and strategy.

America Revealed
Thu, 02/13/2014 - 9:00pm

America is a nation of vast distances and dense urban clusters, woven together by 200,000 miles of railroads, 5,000 airports and four million miles of roads. These massive, complex transportation systems combine to make Americans the most mobile people on earth. Accompany host Yul Kwon as he journeys across the continent by air, road and rail, venturing behind the scenes with the workers who get us where we need to go. At the federal Aviation Administration command center, listen in on a call with NASA, the sercret service, the military and every major airline to learn how our national flight plan works today. Go along as he meets innovators creating ways to propel us farther and faster in years to come; in Las Vegas, he heads out into the wild night to see how transportation analysts are keeping traffic at bay by revolutionizing the use of one basic tool: the traffic light. Uncover the minor miracles and uphill battles involved in moving more than 300 million Americans every day on infrastructure built in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Independent Lens
Wed, 02/12/2014 - 7:00pm

Whitney M. Young, Jr. was one of the most celebrated — and controversial —leaders of the civil rights era. In “The Powerbroker: Whitney Young's Fight for Civil Rights,” follow his journey from segregated Kentucky to head of the National Urban League. Unique among black leaders, Young took the fight directly to the powerful white elite, gaining allies in business and government, including three presidents. He had the difficult tasks of calming the fears of white allies, relieving the doubts of fellow civil rights leaders and responding to attacks from the militant Black Power movement.

America Reframed
Tue, 02/11/2014 - 8:00pm

Through the lens of 26 independent films, America ReFramed tells the many stories of a transforming American culture and its broad diversity. In these weekly 60 or 90 minute independent films, the series takes an unfiltered look at relevant domestic topics (healthcare, immigration, the workplace, and politics) with personal storytelling tied to programming social themes.

Independent Lens
Mon, 02/10/2014 - 7:00pm

Soul food is a quintessential American cuisine, with a rich history and an abiding significance for black cultural identity. But with its celebration of all things fried and smothered, it has also had lasting effects on the health of African Americans. Join filmmaker Byron Hurt for a look at soul food: from its roots in Western Africa to its incarnation in the American South to its contribution to modern health crises in communities of color. “Soul Food Junkies” also looks at the socioeconomics of the American diet, and how the food industry profits from making calories cheap, but healthy options expensive and hard to find.

Thu, 04/17/2014 - 2:00pm

ONE NIGHT IN MARCH tells the story of a historic college basketball game that captured the national imagination, influenced a state and helped redefine a sport. Interviews, rare footage and archival photos transport viewers back to a tumultuous time in United States history, just as the Civil Rights movement began gaining momentum throughout the South. In the late 1950s and early '60s, Mississippi State University's powerhouse basketball program earned several conference titles and national rankings. Despite their success, the Bulldogs could not play in the NCAA national championship due to an unwritten rule prohibiting all-white Mississippi collegiate athletic teams from competing against integrated teams. Mississippi State's president, its head basketball coach and their players ultimately risked their safety and their futures by defying this rule — not to mention the governor and state legislature — in pursuit of a national championship. This award-winning documentary recounts the 1962-1963 season and the events leading up to the team eventually playing in the tournament against the integrated Loyola University (Chicago) club. ONE NIGHT IN MARCH concludes with a return trip to Loyola, where former players from those teams celebrate the landmark game they participated in 50 years earlier.

Fri, 02/07/2014 - 6:00pm

On January 28, 1963, a young black man from Charleston named Harvey Gantt enrolled at Clemson College, making him the first African American accepted to a white school in South Carolina. The absence of drama or violence surrounding Gantt's enrollment — the result of nearly two years of detailed preparation and planning on the part of college administrators, state politicians and business leaders — made headlines at the time, but soon it faded from the public consciousness. Narrated by Tony-winning actor Phylicia Rashad, THE EDUCATION OF HARVEY GANTT tells this pivotal, yet largely forgotten, story of desegregation. Interviews with Gantt, distinguished scholars and civil rights veterans, and archival footage and reenactment illuminate the events leading up to Gantt's enrollment, the unfolding of entrance day and the impact of Clemson's integration on the state and the nation.

America Revealed
Thu, 02/06/2014 - 9:00pm

AMERICA REVEALED takes viewers on a journey high above the American landscape to reveal the country as never seen before.

Technology expert and communications attorney Yul Kwon (winner of “Survivor: Cook Islands”) hosts this exciting new PBS series that travels through time, space and systems to reveal a nation of interdependent and intricately interwoven networks that feed and power the nation, produce millions of goods, transport people great distances and still come together to make America work. These networks all rely on vast, complex and precisely calibrated systems, yet most Americans have never had the chance to observe or understand them. Until now.

P.O.V.
Wed, 02/05/2014 - 7:00pm

“American Promise” spans 13 years as Joe Brewster and Michèle Stephenson, middle-class African-American parents in Brooklyn, New York, turn their cameras on their son, Idris, and his best friend, Seun, who make their way through Manhattan’s Dalton School, one of the most prestigious private schools in the country. Chronicling the boys’ divergent paths from kindergarten through high school graduation, this provocative, intimate documentary presents complicated truths about America’s struggle to come of age on issues of race, class and opportunity. Winner, U.S. Documentary Special Jury Award, 2013 Sundance Film Festival.

AfroPop: The Ultimate Cultural Exchange
Mon, 02/03/2014 - 8:00pm

After the civil war in Sierra Leone, many visitors now stay away from the picturesque beach village of Lakka. Five villagers share their stories of life on the ocean, of living off the land, and of war, love and religion as they try to convince tourists to visit a nation still healing from a devastating war.

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