World

America Revealed
Wed, 03/05/2014 - 11:00am

AMERICA REVEALED takes viewers on a four-hour journey high above the American landscape to reveal the country as never seen before.

Technology expert and communications attorney Yul Kwon (winner of “Survivor: Cook Islands”) hosts this exciting new PBS series that travels through time, space and systems to reveal a nation of interdependent and intricately interwoven networks that feed and power the nation, produce millions of goods, transport people great distances and still come together to make America work. These networks all rely on vast, complex and precisely calibrated systems, yet most Americans have never had the chance to observe or understand them. Until now.

Tue, 03/04/2014 - 3:00pm

Transformative Chefs is an engaging, hour-long, special that tells the stories of three iconic celebrity chefs who are transforming the way we eat. This special highlights each chef's personal journey: how food helped celebrated chef Lidia Bastianich maintain her heritage after she immigrated to America; why food icon Ming Tsai raised a million dollars for Boston Marathon bombing victims; and why Presidential favorite Marcus Samuelsson is mentoring the next generation of chefs in Harlem. By focusing on inspiring human stories rather than recipes, the special indicates how food can be much more than nourishment. Host Alison Stewart conducts the intimate interviews, which include visits to special places that have helped shape the lives of each chef.

America Revealed
Thu, 02/27/2014 - 9:00pm

American manufacturing has undergone a massive revolution over the past 20 years. Despite all the gloom and doom, America is actually the number one manufacturing nation on earth. Yul Kwon crosses the nation looking at traditional and not-so traditional types of manufacturing.

Tue, 02/25/2014 - 7:00pm

THE BLACK KUNGFU EXPERIENCE introduces kungfu's African-American pioneers, men who challenged convention and overturned preconceived notions while mastering the ancient art. The four martial artists profiled include Ron Van Clief, an ex-Marine and Vietnam veteran who starred in more than 40 kungfu films and earned the nickname "Black Dragon" from Bruce Lee. Their compelling stories illustrate how kungfu began as – and remains – a unique crucible of the black experience. In particular, kungfu's themes of the underdog triumphing against the odds resonated in black communities across the United States.

AfroPop: The Ultimate Cultural Exchange
Mon, 02/24/2014 - 8:00pm

"Dear Mandela" by Dara Kell and Christopher Nizza, captures the demonstrations of residents of the Durban shantytowns as they fight for the decent living conditions promised by the post-apartheid government and challenge the African National Congress (ANC).

America Revealed
Thu, 02/20/2014 - 9:00pm

Our modern electric power grid has been called the biggest and most complex machine in the world — delivering electricity over 200,000 miles of high-tension transmission lines. Travel around the country with host Yul Kwon to understand its intricacies, its vulnerabilities and the remarkable ingenuity required to keep the elctricity on, every day of the year. At New York State's governing control room, learn how a massive blackout cut power to 40 million Americans; to understand how we can protect against this type of colossal failure, join a team who makes daring repairs from the side of a helicopter in flight. Visit the country's largest coal mine, rappel down the side of a wind turbine, take a rare tour of a nuclear plant and travel on a massive tanker — as Kwon reflects on the challenges and opportunities to keep the power flowing.

Independent Lens
Wed, 02/19/2014 - 7:00pm

In 1957, Daisy Bates became a household name when she fought for the right of nine black students to attend the all-white Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. Bates's public support culminated in a constitutional crisis — pitting a president against a governor and a community against itself. As head of the Arkansas NAACP, and protector of the nine students, Daisy Bates would achieve instant fame as the drama played out on national television and in newspapers around the world. But that fame would prove fleeting and for her attempts to remain relevant, she would pay a hefty price.

Independent Lens
Tue, 02/18/2014 - 7:00pm

Combining startlingly fresh and candid 16mm footage that had lain undiscovered in the cellar of Swedish Television for the past 30 years, with contemporary audio interviews from leading African-American artists, activists, musicians and scholars, ”Mixtape” looks at the people, society, culture and style that fuelled an era of convulsive change, 1967-1975. Utilizing an innovative format that riffs on the popular 1970s mixtape format, this is a cinematic and musical journey into the black communities of America.

Mon, 02/17/2014 - 11:30am

The Civil War began as a means of preserving the Union. However, to nearly four million African Americans, it held a much more personal promise. As Northern armies swept south, self-emancipated slaves sought refuge behind Union lines. Determined to claim basic human rights, these former slaves-turned-soldiers fought valiantly for the Union – and many sacrificed their lives for the cause. LOOKING OVER JORDAN: AFRICAN AMERICANS AND THE WAR chronicles the black experience in the South before, during and after the war. The informative documentary features interviews with Civil War scholars, historical re-enactments, and primary readings from abolitionist Frederick Douglass, U.S. Secretary of State William Seward, Louis B. Hughes' autobiography Thirty Years a Slave, and the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863. Among many topics, the documentary covers the marked rise of slavery between 1790 and 1860, the role of religion and music in the slave narrative, the influx of freed black slaves into the Union army, heroics at the Battle of Nashville in December 1864, both Confiscation Acts, and the creation of the Bureau of Freedman, Refugees and Abandoned Land to aid freed slaves in the early Reconstruction era.

Thu, 03/06/2014 - 4:00pm

Watch a portrait of the U.S. sled hockey team as they prepare for the Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia. Sled hockey, also known as “murderball on blades,” is played as aggressively as able-bodied hockey — but these players battle with their sticks, sharp sled runners and the serrated ice picks used to propel their sleds. Strapped into molded sleds, they’re often playing at eye level with the fast-moving puck in this game of force, speed and strategy.

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