World

Nature
Tue, 03/26/2013 - 9:00pm

Around the globe, unique and fascinating species face extinction from hunting and habitat destruction, which affects vulnerable animals in every kind of environment.  Biologists, conservationists, wildlife preservation centers and zoological parks work to breed and shelter rare and critically endangered animals when and where they can, but many species are down to the last few individuals and face an increasingly uncertain future.

No Job For A Woman
Sun, 03/24/2013 - 7:00pm

Journalists Martha Gellhorn, Ruth Cowan and Dickie Chappelle shattered the gender barrier by defying their disbelieving (male) sexist colleagues (including Gellhorn’s husband Ernest Hemingway) and covering WWII from the front lines. Michele Midori Fillion gives these pioneering legends their due.

World Special
Sat, 03/23/2013 - 4:00pm

THE LEGEND OF PANCHO BARNES AND THE HAPPY BOTTOM RIDING CLUB chronicles the thrilling life and extraordinary times of aviation pioneer Florence Lowe "Pancho" Barnes, one of the most colorful and accomplished women pilots of the early 20th century. Narrated by Tom Skerritt, with Kathy Bates as the voice of Barnes, THE LEGEND OF PANCHO BARNES employs newly discovered personal files, never-before-seen photos and rare movie footage to tell her story.

World Special
Fri, 03/22/2013 - 6:00pm

Water is a central element of life, yet one in eight people worldwide — 1.2 billion — lack access to safe drinking water. In the coming years, the water scarcity in some drought-stricken regions will turn into a global crisis. Hosted by actor-producer Adrian Grenier (HBO's Entourage), WATER PRESSURES sheds light on this critical, complex issue by documenting the partnership between villagers in water-distressed Rajasthan, India and students and faculty at Northwestern University, situated on the shores of Lake Michigan. 

Shipping Out
Wed, 03/20/2013 - 7:00pm

SHIPPING OUT: THE STORY OF AMERICA'S SEAFARING WOMEN celebrates the modern-day women who work in commercial shipping — on the container ships, bulk cargo carriers and tankers, coastal tugs, barges and ferry boats that traverse America’s waterways. The program explores the little-known history, mythologies and traditional attitudes which, until recently, limited women's participation in seafaring. 

Nature
Tue, 03/19/2013 - 6:00pm

In February 2009, conditions were ripe for wildfires in the state of Victoria in southeast Australia. Relentless heat waves, seemingly endless drought, and arid winds sweeping in from the outback had left the countryside tinder dry and braced for the worst. Then, on Saturday, February 7, Victoria went up in flames; and raging fires engulfed everything in their path.

American Masters
Mon, 03/18/2013 - 7:00pm

Three-time Emmy®-nominated filmmaker Kenneth Bowser examines one of American history’s most iconic folk music heroes and political agitators. Phil Ochs: There But for Fortune is a revealing biography of a conflicted, truth-seeking troubadour who, with guitar in hand, stood up for what he believed in and challenged us all to do the same.

Winslow Homer
Fri, 03/15/2013 - 7:00pm

WINSLOW HOMER: SOCIETY AND SOLITUDE profiles the life and work of one of the greatest American artists of his time (1836-1910). Two one-hour programs chronicle Winslow Homer's evolution from wood-engraver to Harper’s Weekly illustrator to an innovative watercolorist best known for his evocative oil paintings. Noted artists and scholars describe a man who lived in the midst of a lively and cosmopolitan New York City art scene, but gradually withdrew from public life, earning him the reputation as the great recluse of American art. 

Human Spark
Thu, 03/14/2013 - 8:00pm

Alan Alda joins researchers studying human children and chimpanzees to discover why we share some skills with our closest living relatives, but have far surpassed them in our most uniquely human capabilities. Though we both descend from a common ancestor and are genetically so similar, why are we worlds apart in our behaviors and abilities?

Frontline
Wed, 03/13/2013 - 6:00pm

The Education of Michelle Rhee begins by explaining that the team followed her for some three years as she worked to reform DC’s broken public schools system. Granted what the show terms “extraordinary power” (“It’s not a democracy,” she tells correspondent John Merrow), she goes on to meet with every principal in the District (an unprecedented effort) and also to develop evaluation protocols, for students, teachers, and administrators.

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