World

Independent Lens
Mon, 02/10/2014 - 7:00pm

Soul food is a quintessential American cuisine, with a rich history and an abiding significance for black cultural identity. But with its celebration of all things fried and smothered, it has also had lasting effects on the health of African Americans. Join filmmaker Byron Hurt for a look at soul food: from its roots in Western Africa to its incarnation in the American South to its contribution to modern health crises in communities of color. “Soul Food Junkies” also looks at the socioeconomics of the American diet, and how the food industry profits from making calories cheap, but healthy options expensive and hard to find.

Thu, 04/17/2014 - 2:00pm

ONE NIGHT IN MARCH tells the story of a historic college basketball game that captured the national imagination, influenced a state and helped redefine a sport. Interviews, rare footage and archival photos transport viewers back to a tumultuous time in United States history, just as the Civil Rights movement began gaining momentum throughout the South. In the late 1950s and early '60s, Mississippi State University's powerhouse basketball program earned several conference titles and national rankings. Despite their success, the Bulldogs could not play in the NCAA national championship due to an unwritten rule prohibiting all-white Mississippi collegiate athletic teams from competing against integrated teams. Mississippi State's president, its head basketball coach and their players ultimately risked their safety and their futures by defying this rule — not to mention the governor and state legislature — in pursuit of a national championship. This award-winning documentary recounts the 1962-1963 season and the events leading up to the team eventually playing in the tournament against the integrated Loyola University (Chicago) club. ONE NIGHT IN MARCH concludes with a return trip to Loyola, where former players from those teams celebrate the landmark game they participated in 50 years earlier.

Fri, 02/07/2014 - 6:00pm

On January 28, 1963, a young black man from Charleston named Harvey Gantt enrolled at Clemson College, making him the first African American accepted to a white school in South Carolina. The absence of drama or violence surrounding Gantt's enrollment — the result of nearly two years of detailed preparation and planning on the part of college administrators, state politicians and business leaders — made headlines at the time, but soon it faded from the public consciousness. Narrated by Tony-winning actor Phylicia Rashad, THE EDUCATION OF HARVEY GANTT tells this pivotal, yet largely forgotten, story of desegregation. Interviews with Gantt, distinguished scholars and civil rights veterans, and archival footage and reenactment illuminate the events leading up to Gantt's enrollment, the unfolding of entrance day and the impact of Clemson's integration on the state and the nation.

America Revealed
Thu, 02/06/2014 - 9:00pm

AMERICA REVEALED takes viewers on a journey high above the American landscape to reveal the country as never seen before.

Technology expert and communications attorney Yul Kwon (winner of “Survivor: Cook Islands”) hosts this exciting new PBS series that travels through time, space and systems to reveal a nation of interdependent and intricately interwoven networks that feed and power the nation, produce millions of goods, transport people great distances and still come together to make America work. These networks all rely on vast, complex and precisely calibrated systems, yet most Americans have never had the chance to observe or understand them. Until now.

P.O.V.
Wed, 02/05/2014 - 7:00pm

“American Promise” spans 13 years as Joe Brewster and Michèle Stephenson, middle-class African-American parents in Brooklyn, New York, turn their cameras on their son, Idris, and his best friend, Seun, who make their way through Manhattan’s Dalton School, one of the most prestigious private schools in the country. Chronicling the boys’ divergent paths from kindergarten through high school graduation, this provocative, intimate documentary presents complicated truths about America’s struggle to come of age on issues of race, class and opportunity. Winner, U.S. Documentary Special Jury Award, 2013 Sundance Film Festival.

AfroPop: The Ultimate Cultural Exchange
Mon, 02/03/2014 - 8:00pm

After the civil war in Sierra Leone, many visitors now stay away from the picturesque beach village of Lakka. Five villagers share their stories of life on the ocean, of living off the land, and of war, love and religion as they try to convince tourists to visit a nation still healing from a devastating war.

Sat, 02/01/2014 - 1:30pm

VISA DREAM tells the touching story of one family's experience gaining entry into the United States, shedding light on the hardships many immigrant families endure. Ramon and Aurora Chavez, an elderly couple living in Jalisco, Mexico, long to reunite with their children who live 2,500 miles away in Los Angeles. In order to visit, they must secure a tourist visa, an expensive and difficult proposition. A camera crew follows them step-by-step through the application process, which begins at the U.S. Consulate two hours away in Guadalajara. There, U.S. Consulate representatives demystify the visa process and illuminate the reasons why they approve some applications — and deny others. VISA DREAM's closing moments capture the tension — and eventual jubilation — as the family learns the results of the interview.

Wed, 01/29/2014 - 1:30pm

Using an extensive network of reporters and correspondents from across the region, ASIA BIZ FORECAST presents the latest in Asian business news and trends. The fast-paced, magazine-style series is produced in English and hosted by Yuko Fukushima.

American Masters
Mon, 01/27/2014 - 4:00pm

Discover the Pulitzer Prize-winning author behind Gone With the Wind, one of the world’s best-selling novels that features two of the world’s great lovers — Scarlett and Rhett — and was adapted into one of the most popular films of all time. No ordinary writer — or woman — Margaret Mitchell was a charismatic force who challenged the stifling Southern social order and struggled with the changing role of women and the liberation of African Americans. She suffered from depression and illness and experienced profound identity shifts during her life, until an accident led to her death in 1949.

Sun, 01/26/2014 - 9:00pm

For ranchers and hunters, wildlife advocates and nature enthusiasts, wolves have become the center of a growing controversy. Almost two decades after the reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park and parts of Idaho, deliberations have begun to remove wolves from the endangered species list. This special explores both sides of the heated issue and examines the role of wolves in Yellowstone, the West and Southwest.

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