Swine Flu

In April 2009, a new strain of influenza was identified. This strain, novel H1N1, or 'swine flu' first appeared in Mexico and has quickly spread around the globe. On June 11, the World Health Organization officially declared the outbreak to be a pandemic. While not particularly severe, the quick spread of 'swine flu' and the widespread media attention it received has prompted worry over the potential impact of a pandemic on our health and society.

The symptoms of 2009 H1N1 flu virus in people include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea. People may be infected with the flu, including 2009 H1N1 and have respiratory symptoms without a fever. Severe illnesses and deaths have occurred as a result of illness associated with this virus.

Illness with 2009 H1N1 virus has ranged from mild to severe. While most people who have been sick have recovered without needing medical treatment, hospitalizations and deaths from infection with this virus have occurred.
In seasonal flu, certain people are at "high risk" of serious complications. This includes people 65 years and older, children younger than five years old, pregnant women, and people of any age with certain chronic medical conditions. About 70 percent of people who have been hospitalized with this 2009 H1N1 virus have had one or more medical conditions previously recognized as placing people at "high risk" of serious seasonal flu-related complications. This includes pregnancy, diabetes, heart disease, asthma and kidney disease.

Young children are also at high risk of serious complications from 2009 H1N1, just as they are from seasonal flu. And while people 65 and older are the least likely to be infected with 2009 H1N1 flu, if they get sick, they are also at "high risk" of developing serious complications from their illness.

CDC laboratory studies have shown that no children and very few adults younger than 60 years old have existing antibody to 2009 H1N1 flu virus; however, about one-third of adults older than 60 may have antibodies against this virus. It is unknown how much, if any, protection may be afforded against 2009 H1N1 flu by any existing antibody.

Guests: 
Dr. Chris Ryan, Medical Director of the Broome County Health Department
Mari Yourdan, Communicable Disease Nurse for the Broome County Health Department
Dr. Janet Corson-Rikert, Executive Director, Cornell Health Services