NPR News

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Robert Siegel talks with Hank Klibanoff, co-author of The Race Beat, about how Martin Luther King Jr. was viewed by the press in the early days, and how its assessments changed over time.
Alberto Nisman, the prosecutor investigating Argentinian President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, has been found dead. He'd accused Kirchner of covering up Iran's involvement in a 1994 bombing.
Schools in Guinea have been closed since the summer, when they were closed due to the Ebola outbreak. As schools finally re-open Monday, one family in the capital, Conakry, is striving to revive its early-morning routine.
When President Obama delivers his State of the Union address Tuesday, he'll be speaking to a Congress dominated by Republicans. At least he can take comfort in the fact that the moment has precedent: Second-term presidents have often found themselves addressing a chamber stocked with the opposition.
Six days from parliamentary elections, Greece is weighing whether to continue its EU-imposed — and unpopular — austerity program. Former Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou discusses the issue.
For archaeologist Eva Jensen, a happenstance find in Nevada has turned into an in-depth quest. Since stumbling across a Winchester rifle manufactured in 1882, she and other researchers have been seeking to unravel the mysteries behind it.