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NPR's Rachel Martin interviews Katie Watson, a professor of medical humanities at Northwestern University, about the doctors who made inappropriate jokes about a sedated patient.
Decades of communism left Kosovo a largely secular place. But after the U.S.-backed war for independence, extremists radicalized young people. Now some have joined the Islamic State in Syria.
NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with Hugh de Kretser, director of the Melbourne-based Human Rights Law Center, about allegations that the government paid smugglers to take the boat back to Indonesia.
Being a governor can be a very good thing if you're running for president. NPR explores the role of governors in presidential races and how they might affect 2016.
A controversial 2013 law, which will likely leave just nine clinics open in the state, is set to go into effect July 1. Abortion-rights supporters have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to intervene.
Spanish novelist Miguel de Cervantes, circa 1600. He published The Adventure...
Tests have confirmed the bones under a Madrid convent belong to Spain's most famous writer. He wished to be buried there because the nuns raised money and paid a ransom when he was captive in Africa.