Fresh Air
Fresh Air with Terry Gross, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Each week, nearly 4.5 million people listen to the show's intimate conversations broadcast on more than 450 National Public Radio (NPR) stations across the country, as well as in Europe on the World Radio Network. Though Fresh Air has been categorized as a "talk show," it hardly fits the mold. Its 1994 Peabody Award citation credits Fresh Air with "probing questions, revelatory interviews and unusual insights." And a variety of top publications count Gross among the country's leading interviewers. The show gives interviews as much time as needed, and complements them with comments from well-known critics and commentators.
Al Michaels will announce the Super Bowl game between the Seattle Seahawks a...
Broadcaster Al Michaels talks about anchoring the Super Bowl; Rock critic Ken Tucker reviews Sleater-Kinney's latest album; Journalist David Morris talks about his book The Evil Hours about PTSD.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Broadcaster Al Michaels Gets Ready To Provide 'Lyrics' For The Super Bowl: Michaels will anchor the Feb. 1 game between the Seattle Seahawks and New England Patriots. He tells Fresh Air about when he fell in love with sports and the hardest sport to announce.

Sleater-Kinney Comes Roaring Back With 'No Cities To Love': Sleater-Kinney is one of the most widely-praised rock bands of the last 20 years. The band formed in the mid-90s in Olympia, Wash., and went on to record seven albums. The group split up in 2006, but have reunited to release a new album, called No Cities to Love, and Fresh Air rock critic Ken Tucker says it's a strong comeback.

In 'The Evil Hours,' A Journalist Shares His Struggle With PTSD: While embedded with troops in Iraq, David Morris almost died when a Humvee he was riding in ran over a roadside bomb. His book explores the history and science of post-traumatic stress disorder.

You can listen to the original interviews here:

Broadcaster Al Michaels Gets Ready To Provide 'Lyrics' For The Super Bowl

Sleater-Kinney Comes Roaring Back With 'No Cities To Love'

In 'The Evil Hours,' A Journalist Shares His Struggle With PTSD

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Scientists think an asteroid killed the dinosaurs. In today's extinction, humans are the culprit. Originally broadcast Feb. 12, 2014.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In the '60s, musicians left New Orleans, major labels lost interest, and Motown and Memphis took over the black music charts. But one producer didn't give up.

New Orleans music didn't do as well in the 1960s, a few hits notwithstanding, as it had done. Musicians left town, major labels lost interest, and Motown and Memphis took over the black music charts. Nonetheless, the late Cosimo Matassa, who owned the only recording studio in town, kept busy. Fresh Air rock historian Ed Ward has the story today.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.