Wait Wait Don't Tell Me
Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! is NPR's weekly hour-long quiz program. Each week on the radio you can test your knowledge against some of the best and brightest in the news and entertainment world while figuring out what's real news and what's made up. On the Web, you can play along too. It takes more than a couple brain cells to make this show what it is... so let's give credit where credit's due. Peter Sagal — Host Prior to becoming host of Wait Wait in 1998, Peter had a varied career including stints as a playwright, screenwriter, stage director, actor, extra in a Michael Jackson video, travel writer, essayist, ghostwriter and staff writer for a motorcycle magazine. In October 2007, Harper Collins published Peter's first book, The Book of Vice: Naughty Things and How to Do Them, a series of essays about bad behavior, which was released in paperback in 2008. He lives in the Chicago area with his family. Since he now has his own Web site, he is finally a real boy. Carl Kasell — Official Judge and Scorekeeper Carl Kasell is the official judge and scorekeeper for Wait Wait and is an all-around genius and great guy. A veteran broadcaster, Carl launched his radio career more than 50 years ago. He was a newscaster for NPR's daily newsmagazine Morning Edition from the show’s beginning in 1979 until December 2009. Carl now enjoys sleeping past 1:05 am, and he sometimes moonlights as a magician.
Our panelists answer questions about the week's news: Lane Violation.

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Our panelists tell three stories involving a fanny pack, only one of which is true.

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Rick Steves in Sognefjord, Norway....
Since we specialize in asking people things they know nothing about, we've decided to ask Rick Steves three questions about the people out there in the world who have his name, but reversed.

Travel guru Rick Steves was born and raised in Seattle, where we're taping our show this week, but he didn't stay put for long. Steves spent most of his adult life traveling the world, writing a series of guidebooks, hosting a travel show for PBS and ruining some of Europe's most treasured cities with hordes of Americans following his advice.

Since we specialize in asking people things they know nothing about, we've decided to ask Rick Steves three questions about people out there in the world named Steve Ricks.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.